Can You Whip Boiled Cream?

By Daniel Berry •  Updated: 11/22/21 

We all know double cream whips really well, but what happens if you have boiled the cream? Will it still whip? Can you whip boiled cream? Well, there is only one way to properly answer this. So I grabbed some double cream, boiled it, then attempted to whip it, lets see how I got on.

So the obvious place to start is by boiling some double cream. I grabbed a little saucepan and stuck it on medium heat and then added the cream.

Boiling the double cream
Boiling the double cream

Here you can see the cream bubbling away. Time to take it off the heat and have a go at whipping it.

I will be using an electric whisk to try and whip this cream. I am going with the electric whisk as I think this will give me the best chance of getting the boiled cream to whip.

If I can get it to whip with the electric whisk then it should be possible to get it to whip with a hand whisk. This will just save me all the effort of finding out.

So I boiled the cream and then poured it into my plastic mixing bowl and got to whipping. After about 5 minutes I stopped and had a look at the boiled cream. To be honest very little had happened, the cream still looked really watery and had not thickened up at all.

So I just kept on whisking. In the end, I think I had whipped this cream for around 30 minutes before taking the photo below.

After trying to whip it for 30 minutes
After trying to whip it for 30 minutes

Yeah… not good results. I think we can see that boiled cream doesn’t whip. This was after a long long time of constant whisking with a high-speed electric whisk and nothing at all has happened.

Clearly boiling the cream does something to the double cream that then stops it from whipping.

Conclusion

So after my testing, it seems that no, you cannot whip boiled cream. For whatever reason, it just doesn’t thicken up at all after being boiled then whisked.

Why Does Cream Whip?

Cream whips because of the fat content within it. When you whip up cream you are adding air bubbles into the cream.

The fat content also gets broken up by the whisking, these fat molecules then get stuck within the air bubbles preventing them from reverting to type.

This is what leads to whipped cream being so light and airy. Not the most scientific writing but I think it gets the reasoning behind why cream whips fairly well.

Are you big on whipping? You might find these related posts interesting, I have done my fair share of whipped experimentation.

Daniel Berry

Hey, I'm Dan, I studied computer science with artificial intelligence at Loughborough University. I try to bring my tech knowledge to the posts where it is needed while also offering a DIY view to go with Sam's professional view on tools. I am a very keen DIY'er and have experience of doing everything the completely wrong way.