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Postcrete vs Concrete

If you have ever set posts then you will have no doubt seen, or been told about, postcrete. But what exactly is postcrete? and how does it differ from good old concrete? Well, I have done all the research possible and have outlined all the differences below, so let’s get stuck in!

Postcrete Vs Concrete

So what exactly is the difference between these two? Well the most obvious, and the one you will notice straight away, is how you use the two. Postcrete is much easier to use than concrete, no mixing is required, just chuck it in your post hole add some water and away you go.

No mixing is required with postcrete

When using postcrete all you have to do is add water to your post hole and then chuck the postcrete in. That’s it, no mixing at all. The postcrete will then proceed to set over 15-20 minutes from my experience. Contrast this with concrete which you have to pre-mix and mix well before putting it anywhere and you can see that postcrete is much easier to use, when setting posts at least.

For concrete, you also need to order sand and ballast, then mix this in well to make concrete. You will also need a mixer if you are making a lot of concrete. You can use a bucket or even just the floor, but this can be slow or in the case of the floor, messy.

Setting time

Concrete can take a long time to set, sometimes even up to a few days before it fully hardens. Whereas postcrete will go hard in a few minutes and be fully set in a few hours. This, along with ease of use, is one of the main advantages of postcrete over concrete.

Price

Concrete made in bulk will also be a lot cheaper than postcrete. This doesn’t include the cost of a mixer or the extra labour involved with making your own concrete. So for just a few small holes postcrete will come out as the cheaper option. But for anything more, such as a full fence with plenty of posts it will be more cost-effective to mix your own concrete.

Is postcrete as strong as concrete?

Concrete is stronger than postcrete. Postcrete only uses very small gravel as ballast whereas in a concrete mix the size and amount of ballast are up to you. Using more ballast in a concrete mix can increase the overall strength of the set concrete.
Because of this postcrete is more likely to crack or break. This is particularly the case around the edges of the postcrete. if you were to try and drill near the edge of set postcrete you may find that this creates a crack and a large chunk of postcrete simply falls off.

How much postcrete do you need per post?

This is dependent on a multitude of different factors including the size of the post and the size of the fence you will be putting up. I have a full post that goes into much more detail here: How Much Postcrete Per Post?
The quick answer is that you will need between 1-2 bags of postcrete per post.

Diane

Wednesday 22nd of June 2022

Would I be crazy to use postcrete to level wonky garden steps ???

Daniel

Wednesday 29th of June 2022

It could work, I would say whats the harm in trying.