How to clean a stove top griddle

by Daniel Berry | Last Updated: 13/01/2021

If you use a cast-iron stove top griddle then you will have no doubt wondered how you should properly clean it? We all know that a cast iron griddle is susceptible to rust, so how do you prevent this when cleaning?

stove top griddle covered in fat

stove top griddle covered in fat

How to clean a stove top griddle

Griddle cleaning is simple enough, you just need to be a little more cautious and follow a few extra steps than you would do with other pots and pans. Here we will take you through a step by step cleaning plan for a griddle that has been used to cook burgers, and as such, has a lot of fat on the griddle surface.

Step One – Remove the fat

Scrape the fat off with a plastic spatula

Scrape the fat off with a plastic spatula

Before cleaning with water you need to remove any fat, grease or food particles from the surface of the griddle. You can do this with a plastic spatula, we don’t want to use anything abrasive like steel wool as this will damage the surface of the griddle. That is why I like to use a plastic spatula for this rather than a metal spatula. This should help you to easily remove most of the excess grease. Our griddle was flat but if you are doing this on a grill griddle then a paper towel or rag might be better for getting into those bumps and hollows.

All the fat scraped off

All the fat scraped off

Step Two – Warm soapy water

clean with warm soapy water and a soft sponge

clean with warm soapy water and a soft sponge

Now you can clean the cast iron griddle using warm soapy water to get the surface clean. Again like before do not use anything abrasive to clean the surface. I like to use a soft sponge. You can do this under the tap with hot water. Warm water is great because it helps to melt away any fat or grease on the griddle surface. Soap and water is all you really need to clean a griddle, just make sure you don’t use an abrasive cleaner, or worse, the dishwasher!

Dishwashers are particularly bad for cast iron skillets as they use steam to dry, meaning your cast iron has plenty of time to rust in a moisture-rich environment. So just stick to warm water and soap.

Step Three – Dry With Kitchen Towel

Dry thoroughly with a kitchen towel

Dry thoroughly with a kitchen towel

Now thoroughly dry the cast iron skillet using a kitchen towel or paper towel. You want to make sure it is as dry as possible here. Take extra time on this step to remove and much of the moisture as you can now. Drying the griddle as much as possible will help to protect the surface from oxidation.

Step Four – Put the griddle on a low to medium heat

Put back on a low medium heat to ensure it is fully dry

Put back on a low medium heat to ensure it is fully dry

I now like to put my skillet over a low medium heat on the stovetop. This will burn off any excess moisture making the griddle extra dry. This will really help prevent rusting as the griddle will be perfectly dry before being put away in a cupboard and left. This cleaning process is quick and simple and really minimises the chances of rust forming on your griddle. You should now have a nice clean griddle ready to cook your next delicious feast. Following this method often will help you keep the griddle surface clean and also keep your griddle rust free.

Finished clean stove top griddle

Finished clean stove top griddle

Extra Step – Rubbing Oil

Most stovetop griddles come with a seasoned surface, meaning they have had a layer of oil applied. This extra step can be done to reapply oil that may have been lost during cleaning. Just take a paper towel and apply a small amount of vegetable oil or olive oil. Then rub this on the full surface of the griddle. So there you have it, my full cleaning method for cleaning a stove top griddle.

You can remove any excess oil with a fresh paper towel if you accidentally apply too much.

 

Hey, I'm Dan, I studied computer science with artificial intelligence at Loughborough University. I try to bring my tech knowledge to the posts where it is needed while also offering a DIY view to go with Sam's professional view on tools. I am a very keen DIY'er and have experience of doing everything the completely wrong way.